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Recette

chorizo & tomato farfalle

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The past few months brought many changes to our household. Many of you know that in May we moved from my hometown of Oxford, Mississippi, to Atlanta, Georgia. That move brought with it an amazing professional opportunity for Andy as well as a total career change for me. Within three weeks I went from working in the non-profit food world to investment management and studying for the CFA.

My new job more accurately reflects what I spent years studying in school, and I’m very grateful for that. I love that everyday new challenges arise and I learn something new. Because I sit at a desk from 9 to 5, though, I am so excited when I come home and let my imagination run wild with culinary possibilities. Working in the food world had a creative side that I truly miss.

The night I made chorizo & tomato farfalle for the first time was not one of those imaginative nights. We had no food in the house so after a long day in the office I grudgingly stopped at Whole Foods on my way home. Totally uninspired, I picked up chorizo and tomatoes. Surely I’d figure out something to make with these ingredients.

Once home, I started cooking on autopilot…not really paying attention to what I was doing. Somehow, this delicious pasta meal resulted. I must say, chorizo & tomato farfalle cheered up my day and made both of our bellies very happy. I hope if you have one of those days, you’ll make this meal and it’ll treat you the same. I think it will.

Ingredients

1 lb. chorizo

2 tbs. olive oil

1 large yellow onion, thinly sliced

2 tsps. salt

1 lb. farfalle

1 lb. tomatoes, sliced in half moons

1 tb. herbes de provence

optional: 1 tsp. cayenne pepper

Chorizo & Tomato Farfalle

Heat a cast-iron skillet on medium-high and put on the chorizo in their entirety. Keep an eye on them and turn them over every few minutes. Let them cook while you work on the other components.

While the chorizo is cooking, caramelize the onion in 1 tablespoon olive oil. Do this by keeping the heat on medium and stirring when it seems the onion might brown. While it’s cooking, add a teaspoon of salt. You’ll know they are finished when they are on the verge of becoming mushy.

Meanwhile, bring a pot of water to a boil. Once boiling, add the farfalle and cook until al dente.

Back to the chorizo. Even if it is not totally cooked through, slice each link into half-inch thick rounds. Continue cooking. At this point, I added a teaspoon of cayenne pepper and stirred it through the chorizo. Andy and I like our food spicy. I totally understand if you don’t want to do this.

Once the onion is caramelized, put it in a bowl, leaving the olive oil in the pan. Place the tomatoes in the olive oil, and sprinkle 1 teaspoon salt and 1 tablespoon herbes de provence atop. Keep the heat on medium and sautée both sides of the tomatoes for about 5 minutes total.

At this point, all the components are ready to be assembled in a bowl. I served it with grated asiago (I recently realized it’s the taste of parmigiano reggiano for half the price) and a green salad with lemon garlic vinaigrette.

Lemon Garlic Vinaigrette

1 lemon

1 garlic clove

1 tsp. salt

1 tsp. pepper

1-2 tbsp olive oil (depends on how much lettuce you have)

This vinaigrette is one of my favorites: squeeze the juice of one lemon into a cup. Press one garlic clove into the juice, add a dash of salt and pepper and let sit for a few minutes. Add one to two tablespoons of olive oil and whisk with a fork until blended. Mix into salad. Delicious.

Let me know what you think of this meal if you make it! It’s turned out to be one of my favorite original recipes…one that I’m always looking forward to making and eating.

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Out + About

discover atlanta: little 5 points

Little 5 Points, often abbreviated as L5P, is a stone’s throw from Virginia Highlands (VaHi). Perhaps VaHi’s black sheep brother, Little 5 is quirky and artsy, too, but with more grit and grunge and possibly authenticity. Known for The Vortex, pizza, music, and Ethiopian food (so I’ve heard), the area draws eccentrics, many of whom seem to have never left.

Maybe it’s the pizza.

No food was involved on my first trip to L5P. I’ll be back soon, though. We’re looking forward to Little 5 Pizza and Savage Pizza. We also look forward to the Kimi’s Bistro and The Vortex. Until then, you can find all of my Atlanta dining experiences in pictures here.

Hey you other ATLiens out there, what are your recommendations to see/do/eat in Little 5 Points? I’d love to check them out.

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Find more on instagrampinteresttwitter.

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